TREASURES OF BOTANICAL PAINTING: The Kew Diamond Jubilee Collection

Celebrating the 60-year Reign
of Her Majesty The Queen

The Kew Diamond Jubilee Collection

Only available at www.florilegia.info

TREASURES OF BOTANICAL PAINTING:
The Kew Diamond Jubilee Collection

Celebrating the 60-year Reign of Her Majesty The Queen

Click to view the next painting A set of fine art prints to commemorate each decade of Her Majesty's reign, specially selected from the works of seven pioneering master botanical painters in the collections of the renowned Library of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Paeonia moutan, Sydenham Teast Edwards, 1809
12th Anniversary; Paeonia moutan, watercolour on paper, Sydenham Teast Edwards, 1809
12th Anniversary; Paeonia moutan, watercolour on paper, Sydenham Teast Edwards, 1809
Born Usk, Monmouth, Wales in 1768, died Queen's Elms, near Brompton, on 8 February 1819

Sydenham Edwards spent most of his career in London, where he worked with William Curtis, who trained him as an artist. Edwards had a prodigious output, producing over 1200 plates for Curtis's Botanical Magazine, between 1787 and 1814. His work was however not confined to plants, and by 1792 he had exhibited a bird painting at the Royal Academy; he continued to produce detailed studies of butterflies, insects, birds and dogs, using both watercolour and gouache. Other work for Curtis included 27 plates for Flora Londinensis (1775-98) and illustrations for his lectures on botany, collected together and published by Curtis's son-in-law Samuel in 1805.

Edwards contributed one plate, that of hyacinths, to Thornton's Temple of Flora (1812), and painted and engraved 61 plates for the Representation of 150 Rare and Curious Ornamental Plants (1809). In 1804 he was elected a fellow of the Linnean Society, and the following year he produced the paintings for Alex MacDonald's (whose real name was RW Dickson) Complete Dictionary of Practical Gardening, and then for his The New Botanic Garden (1812). He contributed paintings to the Annals of Botany (1805-6), and after his death plates copied from his paintings appeared in Encyclographie du Règne Vegetal (1833-38). Curtis died in 1799, and in 1815, Edwards left Curtis's magazine to found his own rival journal, The Botanical Register, whose editorship was later taken over by John Lindley.

Rix p. 244, in Treasures of Botanical Art, RBG, Kew : Richmond, 2008